Private Vs. Public Blood Banks

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Private Vs Public
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With a private family cord blood bank, you will have peace of mind in case a loved one ever gets sick or requires a blood transfusion. This type of blood bank will gather the umbilical cord and then process it, preserving it through controlled freezing. Through private cord blood banking, a family is able to save the cord blood specifically for themselves.
Using a private blood bank can improve quality of life because you can rest assured that a supply is specifically available to you or your loved ones when needed. If your baby is diagnosed before birth with a health condition that makes them eligible to participate in a clinical trial, you may also be eligible to utilize a private blood bank without cost to your loved ones. There are assistance programs that would allow you to travel to deliver at hospital that would collect the cord blood, to be preserved for a later date. Your baby would also receive adequate care.
 
It is more beneficial and advantageous to donate to a private blood bank because the cord blood donation will always be there for you and loved ones when you need it.
If a family member has a medical condition which meets specific qualifications, some banks will store the cord free of charge through their charity program. These including medical conditions such as the following:

  • – lymphoma
  • – leukemia
  • – tumors not derived from the blood or immune system
  • – inherited metabolic disorders
  • – pre-leukemia

Then, the blood bank is available specifically for your loved ones when they need it. This can guarantee peace of mind. Cord blood cells are easier to match than bone marrow cells; they are also more convenient than bone marrow cells.
In contrast, donations to public cord banks are made available to anyone in the general public requiring a cord blood transplant or transfusion. Public collection, preservation and banking are free to all donors. Pediatricians currently recommend donations to public blood banks as well as private, because the blood then thereby becomes available to anyone who needs it, for the very same health conditions that private blood banks use them for. There is also an extremely high chance that public cord blood will be used. Unfortunately, many donors become discouraged from donating because less than 200 hospitals handle the collection of cord blood, because they are too far from blood bank or because lack of equipment and/or resources.